Video 16 Apr 5 notes

Some work from my portfolio site!

Video 31 Mar 20 notes

Happy finale How I met your Mother!

Link 12 Mar 2 notes Inkarat Mittongtare's Portfolio»

I started a portfolio blog for more finished work.

Photo 6 Mar 11 notes I did a Megaman redesign based on Kirobo for my painted metals assignment.

I did a Megaman redesign based on Kirobo for my painted metals assignment.

Text 26 Feb 731 notes

ramen-kider:

ramen-kider:

WAIT POKEMON TURNS 18 TOMORROW?

IM TWO YEARS YOUNGER THAN POKEMON

I SHARE A BIRTHDAY WITH THE POKEMON FRANCHISE EVIDENTLY HOLY SHIT

image

THIS IS SURREAL

Wat born on the same day.

(Source: ruininoyima)

Video 24 Feb 56,206 notes

kidkyan:

thegoddamazon:

thechroniclesoflee:

sixpenceee:

First of all, that first statement is an overgeneralization. Not every Chinese person is going to be skilled at math of course. It’s ignorant to go into these stereotypes. 

But try this:

4,8,5,3,9,7,6.

Read them out loud to yourself. Now look away, and spend twenty seconds memorizing that sequence before saying them out loud again.

If you speak English, you have about a 50 percent chance of remembering that sequence perfectly If you’re Chinese, though, you’re almost certain to get it right every time. 

Why is this? 

One explanation is because the Chinese language allows them to read numbers faster. 

Chinese number words are remarkably brief. Most of them can be said in less than 1/4th of a second (for instance, 4 is ‘si’ and 7 ‘qi’)

Their English equivalents—”four,” “seven”—are longer: pronouncing them takes about 1/3 of a second. 

The English number system is also VERY illogical. 

For example, right after the word 10, instead of saying one-ten, two-ten, three-ten we have different words like 11,12. 

Not so in China, Japan and Korea. They have a logical counting system. Eleven is ten one. Twelve is ten two. Twenty-four is two ten four, and so on.

That difference means that Asian children learn to count much faster. Four year old Chinese children can count, on average, up to forty. American children, at that age, can only count to fifteen, and don’t reach forty until they’re 5 years old.

The regularity of their number systems also means that Asian children can perform basic functions—like addition—far more easily.

Ask an English seven-year-old to add thirty-seven plus twenty two, in her head, and she has to convert the words to numbers (37 + 22).

 Ask an Asian child to add three-tens-seven and two tens-two, and no translation is necessary. 

SOURCE: X

MORE POSTS LIKE THIS: X

Huh. That’s really interesting!

This makes so much more sense than the racist bullshit people come up with.

this applied to Thai language as well. 

Ehhhh Thai numbers still have some weird ones like the two digit numbers ending in 1, still better than English though.

Video 3 Feb 7,089 notes

vicious-cosplay:

The ‘Open Book Cosplayer’ Project

There is a stigma in the cosplay community that most cosplayers would prefer to hide the tactics used in order to make a particular cosplay. This project is dedicated to raising awareness for those cosplayers who are open to being asked questions and more than willing to help those in need. In short, you are an ‘Open Book’ full of information for all who seek it. 

The badges above represent some of the most general topics of cosplay craftsmanship, including wig work, tailoring or sewing, prop making, and armor making. This does not mean that you claim to be a master of this or that type. It is simply to say you feel confident enough to answer questions on these subjects and in the event you don’t know, you’re good at re-directing them to someone who might know better.

By posting one of these badges, you are openly saying that you are more than welcome to take questions from cosplayers on your craftsmanship tactics and workings. Of course this in turn means that asking cosplayers should also know to credit and thank those that helped them out. 

Click here if you’d like to download these badges for your own use.  Feel free to put them on your page, resize them, put them on backgrounds, ect. Post them however you please.

If you do use these badges, please link back to this post so people can learn more about what an ‘Open Book Cosplayer’ is. 

Also utilize the tag Open Book Cosplayer so people can find cosplayers to ask!

Video 31 Jan 6 notes

School work for material rendering. haven’t done any Green Lantern stuff in awhile. Also, I really miss playing Pokemon since school started so I redesigned the pokedex.

Video 28 Jan 1,775 notes

incomparablyme:

The Mother singing La Vie En Rose

via Josh ツ.
Video 24 Jan 9,884 notes

pretentioussunsets:

Metropolis( 2001), Great film


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